Educators. Students. Community members. Much more unites us than divides us, particularly knowing we all wear multiple hats. Building relationships. Thinking BIG.
Challenging and supporting one another. Developing engaged, empathetic citizens. Please join me in pondering how best to nurture these common ground connections.


Monday, October 15, 2012

Invisible Children, The Power of We

"Ms. Gallagher, Can we please go see the Invisible Children presentation in the auditorium during class today?" my former student Brad asked as he entered our chemistry class.

"Well, we have a pretty busy day scheduled today," I responded.

"Please, Ms. G. I am really interested in learning about this and no other teacher has let me go. We'll all learn from it, I'm sure."

I could tell by the look in his eyes that this was really important to him. So I said, "Field Trip!"

It was one of the best decisions I've ever made. I was moved beyond description, shedding enormous amounts of tears, sadness paralleled with a sense of calling. Moreover, I brought home what I learned and shared it with my family. It quite literally changed my daughters' lives, along with the lives of thousands of other young adults across the globe.

The Invisible Children (IC) organization is living proof of the famous saying, "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed it's the only thing that ever has." (Margaret Mead)

Nine years ago, three young college graduates left on what they expected to be the happiest adventure of their lives. They went to Uganda to make a documentary. They were caught completely unaware, walking into the longest running war in Africa, seeing first hand atrocities that were impossible to process. These young men ended up making a promise to a little Ugandan boy who had recently watched the brutal killing of his brother. They told him they were going to do everything in their power to end the war and bring families back together.

Today, this small group of dedicated, caring people are still going strong, only they're not so small anymore! There are ~68 members who work full time in San Diego, the Invisible Children's headquarters. There are also ~86 people working over in Uganda. And there are thousands of young adults across the world actively doing their part to help this organization end this war and bring families back together.

Invisible Children has made this idea more than just a thought. They have given our young adults the opportunity to participate in a movement that is legitimately saving lives and changing the world for the better. IC teaches our youth not to wait to be the change they want to see in the world. IC gives them the power to do something now. They are learning that the Power of We does make a difference.

9 comments:

Susan May said...

This sounds incredible. Thank you for sharing... It is really remarkable what people are capable of once they put their minds to it. So many amazing causes out there. The title "Invisible Children" caught my eye because I also wrote about children today, but in a different way. Here's my post: http://www.togetherwalking.com/1/post/2012/10/the-key-to-the-power-of-we.html

Sarah said...

This story is so inspiring and really shows that if you care about something a lot, you can really work to make a difference in the world. I personally am very touched and interested in "Invisible Children" and I hope other readers are too.

Sarah said...

This story is so inspiring and really shows that if you care about something a lot, you can really work to make a difference in the world. I personally am very touched and interested in "Invisible Children" and I hope other readers are too.

YeJin Jang said...

I also went to the presentation as a class and I didn't know anything about the Invisible Children. After the presentation I was shocked and just surprised. It just touched me how people really care for other that you don't even know.
Thank you for sharing.

YeJin Jang said...

I also went to the presentation as a class and I didn't know anything about the Invisible Children. After the presentation I was shocked and just surprised. It just touched me how people really care for other that you don't even know.
Thank you for sharing.

Jen's Blogfolio said...

This relates to Rachel's challenge. It only takes a few to start a chain reaction.

Emma's Blogfolio said...

Thank you for sharing! I remember the invisible children presentation last year, and it really left an impact on me. It was super interesting and made me really sad. The story was very inspiring, so thank you for letting your students to go last year, because I think every student should see this presentation

Ryan Bretag said...

I wonder if anyone will submit a Spartans Connect workshop experience with this group. Given the passionate response and connections from students, I hope!

Toby Blogfolio 150260 said...

Thank you so much for sharing this story. As a student, it's inspiring to see that age plays little impact in making a difference on the world. After all of the negativity that was surrounding Invisible Children for those few weeks in the summer, it's great to hear someone speak so positively of such a great cause and organization.